Equestrienne (Amazone) [LF 22]

1917 (model inscribed 1918); cast 1930 or 1931

inscribed: C. LACHAISE 1918

stamped: ROMAN BRONZE WORKS N–Y–

11 inches high X 9 inches across base

Twelve other casts are known to have been produced during Lachaise’s lifetime. Isabel Lachaise (1872–1957), the artist’s widow, authorized a small number of posthumous casts. An edition of three casts designated as Lachaise Foundation casts has been completed, and an artist’s proof was made in 2005 for that Foundation.

 

Provenance

Weyhe Gallery, New York
Private Collection, New York. from the above, 1935.
By descent to the present owner.

Lachaise’s sculpture of a horse and nude female rider was modeled in 1917, and the first bronze cast was made for the sculptor’s solo exhibition in February 1918 at the Bourgeois Galleries in New York City. That cast was published to illustrate the review of the show by Henry McBride, “Gaston Lachaise, Sculptor,” Fine Arts Journal, vol. 36, no. 3 (March 1918), p. 53.

For the 1918 show, the work was named Amazone by the gallery dealer, Stephan Bourgeois. Lachaise himself referred to the group as Woman on Horseback, and after his death it also became known as Equestrienne. Evidently inspired by Lachaise’s delightful childhood memory of a circus performer, the sculpture has aptly been characterized as “a beautiful series of curves” by A. E. Gallatin, in his book on the artist (Gaston Lachaise [New York: E.P. Dutton, New York, 1924], p. 14).

In addition to the bronze exhibited in 1918 (presently unlocated), twelve casts are known to have been produced during Lachaise’s lifetime. One of these was made by Lachaise in 1923 and consigned to the C. W. Kraushaar Galleries in New York City; ten were cast in 1930–31 for the Weyhe Gallery in New York City; and another was sold by Lachaise to a collector in 1934. Two of these casts are in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and the San Diego Museum of Art, and two are in private collections. The lifetime cast formerly owned by the Museum of Modern Art in New York City is unlocated, as are the seven other lifetime casts. Isabel Dutaud Nagle Lachaise (1872–1957), the artist’s widow, authorized a small number of posthumous casts. An edition of three casts designated as Lachaise Foundation casts has been completed, and an artist’s proof made by the Modern Art Foundry, New York, in 2005 is owned by the Foundation.