Woman Standing [LF 83]
Circa 1915; cast circa 1917

Bronze
11 inches high
Inscribed: G. LACHAISE
Inscribed on underside: 26
Stamped: R.B.W

One of two pre-Foundation casts; the second was cast between 1927 and 1956. Two casts of a projected edition of nine numbered casts were issued by the Lachaise Foundation, the first by 1971 and the second by 1980.

 

Provenance

Private Collection, Ryde, England (gift from the artist or the artist’s widow).
By descent.
Gerald Peters Gallery, New York.
Private Collection, New York, from the above.

 

Exhibited

New York, New York, Gerald Peters Gallery, Georgia O’Keeffe and Other Modernists, October 29- December 18, 2009.

Santa Fe, New Mexico, Gerald Peters Gallery, Works by Gaston Lachaise: A Modern Epic Vision, August 10-September 22, 2012, traveled to Gerald Peters Gallery, New York, New York, November 15-December 21, 2012.

 

Literature

Julia Day, Jens Stenger, Katherin Eremin, Narayan Khandekar and Virginia Budny, Gaston Lachaise: Characteristics of His Bronze Sculpture, Cambridge: Massachusetts, 2012, p. 67.

Alice Duncan, ed., Works by Gaston Lachaise: A Modern Epic Vision, Santa Fe: Gerald Peters Gallery, 2012, pl. 7 (the caption for plate 10 refers to this particular cast).

The present work is one of a series of small figures created by Lachaise between 1906 and 1917. Further, it was one of a group of works by Lachaise cast in bronze circa 1917 while he was preparing for his first solo show, held at the Bourgeois Galleries, New York, in 1918. Long after this bronze was cast, Lachaise inscribed a 1927 copyright date on the plaster model, a common practice. All three of the subsequent bronze casts reproduce the 1927 copyright date: the example in the Collection of the Whitney Museum (formerly Edith Halpert Collection) was cast sometime the year in which Lachaise inscribed the copyright date on the model and 1956, the earliest known document for that work, and two examples of a projected edition of nine numbered casts were made for the Lachaise Foundation by the early 1970’s (the first of these Foundation casts is illustrated in Alice Duncan, ed., Works by Gaston Lachaise: A Modern Epic Vision, Santa Fe: Gerald Peters Gallery, 2012, pl. 10; the caption is incorrect). The statuette beautifully expresses Lachaise’s response to his beloved, Isabel Dutaud Nagle (1872-1957), who he was to marry in 1917.